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Video Blog - July 28th

Big Bear Back & New Bow

By Clay Newcomb

Check out the mount that won second place at the national taxidermy competition and see Clay's new Timberghost bow. 

I had tremendous four days in Missoula, Montana attending the Boone and Crockett Measurer's class. We were instructed, in great detail, in the proper methods of scoring 38 categories of North American big game. Learning to score was a highlight, but it certainly wasn't the emphasis of the intense pow-wow. A branch of B&C keeps records of big game horn, antler, skull and tusk measurements, but the clubs primary purpose and influence has been in habitat management and conservation of big game as a renewable resource. B&C is the oldest hunting/conservation organization in North America - the big brother of conservation.
When it comes to hunting gear and gadgets I consider myself to be a minimalist, but after hearing from so many friends and their success with calling black bears I figured I'd get a sow-in-heat call and pull it out if the right opportunity presented itself. It just so happened that on the very first hunt I guided this past spring in Alaska I was able put my new call to use.
As I told you last week, I will be going to Alaska in mid-August on a Coastal Brown Bear hunt. Any type of weapon is legal for the hunt (that meets the AK regulations for archery and rifles). However, Brown Bear with archery equipment is indisputably one of the top challenges North America offers the archer. Behind the Polar Bear, the Brown Bear is the largest land carnivore in the world. Kodiak Brown Bears can even rival the size of the largest Polar Bears.
The next couple of blogs I will be discussing my preparation for an Alaskan Brown Bear hunt this August. I will be discussing a few of my equipment choices and analyzing my training and preparation for this hunt of a lifetime.

Jun 09 2014

Broadheads for Black Bears - June 9th Video Blog

Broadheads for Black Bears

The introduction of expandable broadheads in the mid-1990s effectively divided the bowhunting community. The previous broadhead options just weren't that different. Were you going to shoot a three-blade Wasp or Thunderhead was sometimes the extent of the banter. I'm sure Native Americans had similar discussions over campfires debating the effectiveness of the different styles of stones points of their era. One thing hasn't changed, hunters don't like letting their target animal get away after it's been shot.